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Moscow Kremlin
1 Tour and Activity

An imposing red-brick fortress stretching along the banks of the Moskva River, the Moscow Kremlin is the grand centerpiece of Moscow and one of Russia’s most recognizable landmarks. Originally the seat of the Russian grand dukes and later home to Soviet leaders such as Lenin and Stalin, the Kremlin is now the Russian president’s official residence.

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State Hermitage Museum

The State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg is the largest art and cultural museum in the world, with more than 3 million items in its collection—only a fraction of which are on display in its 360 rooms. The main museum complex comprises six historic buildings on the Palace Embankment and includes exhibitions of works of art from the 13th to 20th centuries, as well as Egyptian and classical antiquities and prehistoric art.

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Lenin's Mausoleum
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One of Moscow’s more unusual attractions, the embalmed body of the Communist revolutionary sits inside a granite and marble tomb on Red Square and attracts a steady stream of visitors. Lenin has been lying in state here since his death in 1924—with the exception of a brief stint in World War II when his body was removed for safekeeping.

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St. Basil’s Cathedral (Pokrovsky Sobor)
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Completed in 1561 after it was commissioned by Ivan the Terrible, St. Basil’s Cathedral is one of the most recognizable and iconic landmarks in Moscow, and perhaps in all of Russia. Officially named Intercession Church, St. Basil and its nine, colorful onion domes reside on the southern end of Red Square, marking the geometric center of Moscow.

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Red Square (Krasnaya Ploshchad)
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Red Square has been Moscow’s historic and cultural epicenter for centuries, holding everything from a medieval marketplace to Soviet military parades to rock concerts. No visit to the Russian capital is complete without a stroll through the square, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that's encircled by some of Moscow’s most iconic landmarks.

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GUM Department Store
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GUM is an abbreviation meaning “Main Universal Store”, from the Russian “Глáвный универсáльный магазѝн”. It is the name of a private shopping mall located in central Moscow, just opposite Red Square. The building is a trapezoidal shape, with a steel framework and a glass roof. This made it quite unique at the time of construction, in the 1890s. From 1890 to the

1920s, the Red Square GUM was known as the Upper Trading Rows and served as a State Department Store. It was built to replace the previous trading rows, which were destroyed during the 1812 Fire of Moscow. However, GUM hasn’t always served as a shopping destination.

In 1928, Joseph Stalin converted it into office spaces, and it only reopened as a department store in 1953. It then became one of the only stores in the former Soviet Union not to suffer from consumer goods shortage, often resulting in long shopper queues spilling into Red Square.

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Pushkin Museum (Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts)
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From ancient Egyptian art to Byzantine masterpieces, through French impressionism and the Dutch Golden Age; the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts presents one of Russia’s largest and most comprehensive collections of international art. More than 600,000 works feature in the permanent collection, housed in a recently renovated museum complex.

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Peter and Paul Fortress (Petropavlovskaya Krepost)

The looming yellow cathedral tower and star-shaped fortifications of the Peter and Paul Fortress dominate St. Petersburg’s riverfront, rising up from the shores of Zayachy Island. Built by Peter the Great in 1703, the fortress boasts a long history, having served as a military base, royal burial site, and political prison.

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Kolomenskoye

Located on parklands overlooking the Moskva River, Kolomenskoye is an open-air museum that brims with architectural gems. Just south of Moscow, the 15th-century UNESCO World Heritage Site once served as a summer residence for the Grand Dukes of Moscow and Russian Tsars.

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Bolshoi Theatre

An architectural landmark and one of Russia’s most prestigious venues, the Bolshoi Theatre is home to the world-famous Bolshoi ballet and opera companies. With a legacy dating back to the late 18th century, the theater hosts regular performances of classics such asLa Traviata,*Carmen,Swan Lake, andThe Nutcracker*.

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More Things to Do in Russia

Moscow Metro (Moskovskiy Metropoliten)

Moscow Metro (Moskovskiy Metropoliten)

With its underground network of trains and tunnels stretching for more than 190 miles (305 kilometers) across 200-plus stations, Moscow’s metro system covers a lot of territory. It’s more than just a transport hub though. Many metro stations are architectural landmarks, built in Soviet times and dubbed "the palaces of the people."

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Tretyakov Gallery (Tretyakovskaya Galereya)

Tretyakov Gallery (Tretyakovskaya Galereya)

Showcasing more than 170,000 works from the 11th to the 20th century, the Tretyakov Gallery is a glorious tribute to Russian art. From medieval icons to Soviet-era masterpieces, it’s the world’s most comprehensive collection of Russian art.

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St. Petersburg Cruise Port

St. Petersburg Cruise Port

The Port of St. Petersburg is the largest port in northwest Russia, serving as one of the world's most popular cruise destinations and the primary gateway between the Baltic Sea and Russia. Ships docking at the St. Petersburg Cruise Port do so in the heart of the city, at Vasilyevsky Island.

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Gorky Park (Park Gorkogo)

Gorky Park (Park Gorkogo)

Once a Soviet-era amusement park, Gorky Park (Park Gorkogo) has reinvented itself in recent years as one of Moscow’s most popular public green spaces. More than 300 acres (120 hectares) of parkland stretch along the Moskva River, featuring walking trails, botanical gardens, and recreational areas.

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Catherine Palace and Park

Catherine Palace and Park

Once the summer residence of the Russian tsars and now a museum, Catherine Palace was named after Catherine I, who had it built in 1717. The structure was later rebuilt into an elaborately decorated Rococo-style palace in 1756 by Bartolomeo Rastrelli under the direction of Empress Elizabeth, meant to rival the Palace of Versailles in France. Today, the palace is famous for its baroque style and neoclassical interior that exemplifies Russian wealth and extravagance. Its main attractions are the Grand Hall, the opulent Amber Room, which is lined with gilded amber wall panels and ornate furniture, and the 1,400-acre (566-hectare) Catherine Park with its masterful landscaping.

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Gagarin Research and Test Cosmonaut Training Center

Gagarin Research and Test Cosmonaut Training Center

Named after Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin—the first person in space—the Gagarin Research and Test Cosmonaut Training Center was once the top secret base of the Soviet Space Program. Now operated by the Russian Federal Space Agency and open to the public; it provides a fascinating insight into Russia’s long history of space exploration.

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Red October Chocolate Factory (Krasny Oktyabr)

Red October Chocolate Factory (Krasny Oktyabr)

Once the production facility of a major Russian confectionery brand, this vast 19th-century red-brick compound began its conversion into a hipster hot spot in the early 2000s. During the day, visitors are drawn to its galleries and entertainment spaces, while at night, its bars, restaurants, and clubs fill with well-dressed revelers.

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Novodevichy Convent (Novodevichiy Monastyr)

Novodevichy Convent (Novodevichiy Monastyr)

With its red and white towers and gleaming gold domes rising up from the banks of the Moskva River, the Novodevichy complex paints a striking picture. Built in the 16th century, the UNESCO World Heritage Site includes the convent where Peter the Great imprisoned his sister Sophia. Its cemetery houses notable Russian figures.

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St. Petersburg Palace Square (Dvortsovaya Ploshchad)

St. Petersburg Palace Square (Dvortsovaya Ploshchad)

Royalty, revolutions, and reformers have swept through Palace Square in St Petersburg, a grand plaza at the foot of the magnificent Winter Palace. Alexander Column dominates the center of Palace Square, which is wrapped by government buildings and remains a favorite gathering place for city-wide celebrations and holidays.

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Moscow Zoo (Moskovskiy Zoopark)

Moscow Zoo (Moskovskiy Zoopark)

Behind the castle-like entrance of Moscow Zoo lie over 50 acres (20 hectares of purpose-built habitats and some 7,000 animal residents—making it the largest zoo in Russia. Native species abound, including polar bears, wolves, and Siberian tigers, as well as elephants, monkeys, and dolphins.

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State Russian Museum (Russkiy Muzey)

State Russian Museum (Russkiy Muzey)

Art enthusiasts visiting St. Petersburg likely already have the State Russian Museum at the top of their itinerary. This is the world’s largest museum of Russian fine art, as well as Russia’s first state-owned art museum, with more than 400,000 works of art on display.

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Senate Square (Senatskaya Ploshchad)

Senate Square (Senatskaya Ploshchad)

Originally named Decembrists’ Square after the December 1825 uprising, Senate Square (Senatskaya Ploshchad is one of St. Petersburg’s most famous public spaces, encircled by some of the city’s top attractions. The unforgettable centerpiece of Senate Square is its Bronze Horseman statue, one of the most iconic symbols of the city.

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Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius (Svyato-Troitskaya Sergieva Lavra)

Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius (Svyato-Troitskaya Sergieva Lavra)

The Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius has been the spiritual center of the Russian Orthodox Church since the mid-14th century. In the small town of Sergiev Posad along Russia’s Golden Ring, the monastery complex is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and an architectural marvel, capped with blue and gold onion domes and surrounded by castle-like walls.

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St. Isaac’s Cathedral (Isaakievskiy Sobor)

St. Isaac’s Cathedral (Isaakievskiy Sobor)

Gold-domed St. Isaac’s Cathedral is one of St. Petersburg’s most recognizable, and most popular, attractions. The 19th-century Orthodox cathedral combines Renaissance, Neoclassical, and Baroque elements, so looks different from many other Russian churches. Rarely used for worship, it now contains an art museum.

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