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3rd Arrondissement
3rd Arrondissement

3rd Arrondissement

Free admission
Paris, 75003

The Basics

With numerous museums, the 3rd arrondissement is a good place to acquaint yourself with local culture and history, but its many little streets also make it a great quarter to wander. When you need a sightseeing break, relax in the neighborhood’s public areas and green spaces, including the lovely and popular Square du Temple–Elie-Wiesel, which features wide pathways, a kids' play area, and nearly 200 types of plants.

Many art-focused walking and cycling tours cover the museums and artistic legacy of Le Marais, and several Metro stops make the area easy to visit independently.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The 3rd arrondissement is a must-visit for those interested in architecture, history, and culture.

  • Wear comfortable shoes; this neighborhood is best explored on foot.

  • Wheelchair users and even people with strollers might find getting around this neighborhood challenging due to narrow sidewalks and lots of cobblestones.

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How to Get There

The 3rd arrondissement is sandwiched between the 2nd, 4th, 10th, and 11th arrondissements of Paris and spans the northern part of the Marais neighborhood, along with parts of the Arts et Metiers area. Metro stops include Rambuteau (which stops right by the Pompidou Center), Arts et Métiers, Chemin Vert, Filles du Calvaire, and République.

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Trip ideas

6 Must-See Paris Museums

6 Must-See Paris Museums

The Do's and Don'ts of the Paris Catacombs

The Do's and Don'ts of the Paris Catacombs


When to Get There

It’s worth visiting the 3rd arrondissement any time of year, though like the rest of the Marais, it can get crowded in the summer months. The area is also particularly fun around the annual Fête de la Musique, held on or around the summer solstice, when makeshift stages pop up all around central Paris.

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Rue de Montmorency

The most famous street in the 3rd arrondissement, the Rue de Montmorency runs from Rue du Temple to Rue Saint-Martin. The street's claim to fame is the house of Nicolas Flamel at No. 51, which dates to 1407, making it the oldest stone house in Paris. (Flamel himself was immortalized by J.K. Rowling in theHarry Potter series.)

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